Following the 2 bombs that went off in 1985, I asked Dorie Olds if she was worried for her safety.  At the time, she didn’t know that her husband, Mark Hofmann was planting the bombs….  Was Dorie really in danger?

GT: Let’s go back to the awful October of 1985. So, I’ve talked with several people that have known Mark and they were all, they were all looking for bombs under their car.

Dorie: Yeah, it frightened a lot of people.

GT:  Curt BenchShannon Flynn, even Michael Quinn. Were you concerned for your safety? Because none of these people believed that it was Mark initially either.

Dorie: Yeah.

GT: Were you concerned?

Dorie:  I wasn’t until Mark called me. He called me and said, “You need to leave the house because you may be in danger.” So he’s telling me this big old lie, scaring me….I remember just running out so fast that I didn’t even close the dishwasher. I remember just running, leaving so fast. And then [I was] talking to Mark later and he laughed when I told him, “Yeah, I left. I grabbed everything.”

“Well you didn’t really need to,” or something like that. He laughed at me because I got scared. I remember that.

GT:  That struck you as pretty odd?

Dorie:  Yes. It was like, “What? And why did you tell me? Why are you telling me I need to leave? If you didn’t want me to leave? Why are you? Why? What?”

Because I did not understand him. What’s going on? And it’s like, if I’m not in danger, why are you telling me I’m in danger? But yeah, he laughed. I remember that.

Find out more of Dorie’s perspective!

Dorie Olds tells her recollections of the preliminary trial, Mark’s plea bargain, and her 5-minute divorce to bomber Mark Hofmann.  It’s a fascinating conclusion to our conversation with Dorie.

GT: And then the plea bargain comes I guess. What did you think?

Dorie: The plea bargain. He was telling his dad. He was telling me, and he was telling his dad “I’m innocent, I’m innocent, I’m innocent.”

And, his dad’s like, “Why are you going to plead guilty to this if you’re innocent? You don’t plead guilty.”

And I’m going, “What is it?” Same thing. “What is it you’re doing?”

And he told both of us a story, which didn’t make sense to me, but i was like, “I don’t understand this. I don’t understand it. I can do nothing.” I could never make him do anything. And that’s the truth. I could never make him do anything. So, again, I [had this] out of control, powerless feeling with him.

And so what he told his dad and I, what he said was, “There’s a reason why I’m doing this. It’s going to protect you and the kids from being killed.” That’s what he said. I don’t know. See, it’s dramatic enough that it’s like, okay. “But I can’t talk about it. I can’t tell you. I can’t.” See. It’s another big story, you know? “But I’m innocent. But I’m going to plead guilty. But I’m doing it to protect my thing. I’m a such a good guy. I’m doing it to protect my family.” That’s the story. So yeah. So that’s what he said.

What are your thoughts on the Hofmann bombings, and Dorie’s experiences?